A critical error has occurred. Please check the Event Viewer for further details.

RESEARCH ARTICLES | RISK + CRYSTAL BALL + ANALYTICS

 In this blog entry, we look at the ideas and forces shaping modern collaboration. The new success factors are presented as well as diffentent schools of thought regarding collaboration and alliances.

All the top dogs in the Monte Carlo Analysis spreadsheet universe have distribution-fitting capabilities. Their interfaces have common elements, of course, since they rely on (for the most part) the same PDFs in their arsenal of distribution-fitters. There are important differences, to be sure. It is hoped this comparison will illustrate pros and cons from a practical standpoint. Before going over our scorecard between Crystal Ball and ModelRisk, there is one more very important capability category begging for review: Correlation.

All the top dogs in the Monte Carlo Analysis spreadsheet universe have distribution-fitting capabilities. Their interfaces have common elements, of course, since they rely on (for the most part) the same PDFs in their arsenal of distribution-fitters. There are important differences, to be sure. It is hoped this comparison will illustrate pros and cons from a practical standpoint. Before going over our scorecard between Crystal Ball and ModelRisk, there is one more very important capability category begging for review: Correlation.

Let the battle begin anew. We continue our journey in uncertainty modeling, having understood how to fit distributions to data using Crystal Ball (CB). How does that experience compare to what ModelRisk (MR) has to offer?

Open the Duke 09_10 Scores spreadsheet with ModelRisk loaded in the Excel environment. We will first create the MR Objects representing the fitted PDFs. (Just as with the CB exercise, it is good practice to examine a variety of best-fitting distributions, rather than blindly accepting the top dog.) Then, in distinctly separate cells, we will create the VoseSimulate functions that behave as sampled values from the PDFs modeled by the MR Objects.

Let the battle begin anew. We continue our journey in uncertainty modeling, having understood how to fit distributions to data using Crystal Ball (CB). How does that experience compare to what ModelRisk (MR) has to offer?

Open the Duke 09_10 Scores spreadsheet with ModelRisk loaded in the Excel environment. We will first create the MR Objects representing the fitted PDFs. (Just as with the CB exercise, it is good practice to examine a variety of best-fitting distributions, rather than blindly accepting the top dog.) Then, in distinctly separate cells, we will create the VoseSimulate functions that behave as sampled values from the PDFs modeled by the MR Objects.

RSS
12345678910Last